ITU marathon man

Monday August 6, 2018

 


The trust’s first intensive care patient to benefit from hydrotherapy has recovered from being completely paralysed to running marathons.

29-year-old Bruce Newman from Worthing was admitted to ITU in Worthing for six weeks last summer and spent another month at Donald Wilson House at St Richard’s after being diagnosed with a rare syndrome that affects the nerves called Guillain-Barre.

While in ITU, Bruce made history by becoming the trust’s first intensive care patient to undergo hydrotherapy, a process complicated by his tracheostomy and the open access into his throat.

Now, 12 months later, Bruce is amazing the same care team by running races and raising funds for the department through Love Your Hospital, the trust’s dedicated charity.

Bruce said: “Since my discharge, it took around eight months to get back to my normal self, but I feel a lot better now – better than when I was admitted anyway – I feel a lot fitter, a lot healthier and overall, I’m feeling great.”

On Sunday 15 July, Bruce ran the 10K Worthing Beat the Tide race raising £470 for ITU, and he is now planning to take on a marathon in Greece to raise even more money for the hospital.

Respiratory physiotherapist, Amelia Palmer, said: “Bruce came back for an appointment and it was amazing to see how much he had progressed in himself. He told us that he had already run a 10k in 55 minutes and I was amazed, it was fantastic!

“For us as physios, it was actually quite emotional to see someone make so much progress. We were so proud of him and for us, it was a real sense of success.”

They go above and beyond…  and they are all an outstanding team

Bruce says that if it was not for the care teams that looked after him he would not have had his new lease of life. He said: “They were incredible and we are so lucky to have them. They are simply amazing. They go above and beyond; they’re friendly, very understanding and they are all an outstanding team.”

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