More ‘NHS portraits for heroes’ dedicated to our colleagues

Monday September 14, 2020

A national project to immortalise in pictures many of the NHS professionals working through the Covid-19 pandemic has seen more than 50 Western colleagues painted for posterity.

The latest three Western Sussex Hospitals staff members nominated for portraits include domestic assistant Musa Manneh, head of nursing Julie Thomas and the Intensive Therapies Unit (ITU) team at Worthing Hospital.

Head of patient safety, Jo Habben, said: “In March 2020, when portrait artist Tom Croft sent out an Instagram post offering to paint the first NHS worker to send him a photo, little did he know it would start an international movement recognising the dedication of the key workers during the pandemic.

“Artists from all over the globe have painted portraits and the #PortraitsforNHSheroes is a national phenomenon.

“The trust has been lucky with many nominations and paintings completed with each division included.

“Domestic assistant, Musa, was nominated by Dave and Sue, and the artist Louise Hurfurd particularly wanted to capture his smiling eyes, so important when communicating and wearing PPE. Thank you Musa.”

Head of nursing, Julie Thomas, was nominated by matron Katie Kimber and chief nurse Maggie Davies, and drawn by artist Steve Martin.

Katie said: “We felt Julie leads our nursing teams in the Medical division with amazing enthusiasm and dedication, which is done efficiently and maintains our high standards. Julie has endless energy and always supports and encourages others to feel enabled to provide the best care and treatment for our patients”

Maggie added: “Julie’s exemplary and tireless nurse leadership through the Covid pandemic was outstanding. Julie’s enduring compassion and care for our patients and families caught up in the pandemic, makes her a true NHS hero.”

The wonderful ITU portrait of colleagues in full PPE was requested by Jo Habben and painted by Sarah Bale.

 

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