Penguins take part in International Clinical Trials Week

Friday May 13, 2016

Penguins summer collection - Final (8)The much-loved penguins at Worthing Hospital are helping to explain the benefits of research during International Clinical Trials Week 2016 (Monday 16  to Friday 20 May).

The metal sculptures, which have been specially decorated for the occasion, are participating in their very own fish experiment to help patients and visitors better understand the importance of clinical trials.

Dr George Findlay, medical director at Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “Clinical research is about improving care for patients and my colleagues working in our hospitals in Chichester, Worthing and Shoreham are committed to always making our services better.

“We have around 150 trials open at the moment and I would like to thank all our patients who are participating in research, many of whom are benefiting from the latest developments in clinical practice and helping to ensure patient care continues to improve and benefits others in the future.”

During International Clinical Trials Week, the Trust’s research team are providing information for patients and visitors in the Penguin Foyer at Worthing Hospital and in the main entrance foyer at St Richard’s in Chichester, with events to celebrate International Clinical Trials week on 17th and 18th May.

Head of Research, Dr Cate Bell, said: “We wish to raise awareness and encourage more patients to be involved in research, as well as showcase what we do well at Western Sussex.

“We are recruiting into about 80 trials at the moment, the majority of which relate to improving the treatment of different types of cancers, but we are also conducting research in areas such as dermatology, stroke, paediatrics, reproductive health, cardiology, gastroenterology and diabetes.”

12-year-old Josh from Worthing is participating in a trial called “It’s My Asthma”, a research study which is helping develop a new asthma tool kit for doctors and nurses to use with teenagers.

Josh is answering questions about his treatment and although he is not benefitting directly from the study he understands its wider significance. He said: “I wanted to do this to help other people with asthma in the future.”

The trust is developing a new Research & Innovation Strategy with a related website which when launched will help patients, as well as clinicians, find out more about what clinical trials are available.

In the meantime, anyone interested in medical research can contact the research department at research@wsht.nhs.uk or call Worthing Hospital ext. 84194 or visit the Penguin Foyer in Worthing Hospital or main entrance at Chichester during International Clinical Trials Week.

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